Amerivespa ‘13: San Diego by the LONG way… through Mexico!

In an attempt to find a witty and telling picture to start off the first part of this awesome blog entry, I already struck a problem that may be more representative of the greater issue.  Let me explain…

In an effort for the sole two members of this gang to pick themselves up, dust themselves off and get BACK on their bikes, we have once again started a plot that focuses around Amerivespa!  This year, it is going to be located in San Diego, California.  This is *much* closer to Phoenix, but that also is a downside as much as an upside.  It removes much of the adventure of going across country on bikes that really weren’t meant for such a journey.  But, as I sat and thought about things, running route scenarios for the summer rally through Google Maps, one thing became noticed as a constant:

Each route aside from one brought us into Mexico, if even for a short time.

Then, as I thought about it, a route started forming in my head.  But, it wasn’t the direct beeline that Amerivespa ‘12 offered up.  I looked at places I’ve always avoided, but have always heard of.  There was Rocky Point (which is located in a city where Wende Machete has a friend who owns a house), bastion to all of those bro-ish adventures on Spring Break.  There is San Felipe, home to the Baja 250 and San Felipe 250 overland races and prime training ground for North American Dakar racers.  There is Ensenada, the resort coastal town and long time resort for those looking for exotic-but-not-so-much from California.  And in between… a nation of adventure that I honestly don’t know as much about as I should living so close.

But, this isn’t unusual for many living in Arizona.  We live next to and depend on so much from Mexico as much as they do from us.  Our cultures constantly bleed into one another.  There is so much in common it’s uncanny, but rarely do you find a border so hotly contested anywhere in the post-industrial world. This leads me to the issue I had finding a picture to start this blog off.

So much of the images I found were VERY racist, anti-Mexican and downright disturbing, even for someone like me who’s seen civil war, police corruption and the inside of the federal prison system first hand.  I realized that outside of the sound-bytes, false claims of “headless bodies in the desert” by psychotic American governors and the real-world kidnappings and massacres that are a very real problem that flash across the screens here in the US, I didn’t really know much.  I have plenty of friends from both sides of the border, and in my world, they’re great people.  But, have I actually *been* to Mexico? I’ve been to Mexicali once and it wasn’t exactly a fun trip, but have I truly given Mexico the chance and the credit it deserves?

Well, there always needs to be a point to adventure.  We travel and challenge not only our bodies and mechanical skills with these kind of trips.  Why not challenge my world view?  Why not go and find more of our biggest neighbor down South and learn more than just slugging across the Midwest on two wheels…again? 

So, after a bit of over-the-phone planning, me and my partner in crime have determined that San Diego Amerivespa ‘13 will be by way of the costal towns of Mexico!  A story of adventure, international intrigue, scooters and  the story of a Roller-Derby Vegan and a Socialist Engineer in an effort to find something they probably shouldn’t: Something more interesting.

Mexico image

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About neotrotsky

A Technical Director at a somewhat-sorta-prestigious live performance studio, audio engineer and secondary engineering student (the second time around) by day. But, by night I am a daring (if not slightly melancholy) motorscooter enthusiast and gearhead searching for a garage and steady paycheck. View all posts by neotrotsky

4 responses to “Amerivespa ‘13: San Diego by the LONG way… through Mexico!

  • wendemachete

    I love the picture where we’re “inserted”! I hope that our adventure doesn’t take us *exactly* there, because if I’m not mistaken, that’s Mexico City. A very long way away from San Diego. That may be a possible idea for a much later date, because there’s no way I’m saying no to a scooter trip to Mexico City, however that might be slightly ambitious for this ride. 🙂
    After our talk last night, I’m super excited! I love Mexico and look forward to seeing it from behind a visor instead of a car or walking across an imaginary line, from which I can still see the car. Between the two of us (and whomever we happen to snag along the way to join us… such as other Slow Kids) I’m confident that not only will this be the trip of a lifetime, but also a wicked fun adventure. I’m glad that you’re on board to trek into Mexico. As soon as you said it, I was all for it. So. Excited!

  • adam

    i am up for the trip too but my stock 2008 stella never does seem to go above 50mph indicated? would that put me as way too “slow kid”? for the mexico to san diego trip? I am in Chandler AZ I am a member of phoenix area scooter club on Meetup

    • neotrotsky

      Realize that on a trip across country, the average speed is actually less than 50mph. Especially in Northern Mexico, where non-highway roads aren’t what we would call “developed” and many of them are dirt roads once you get off of the main road. It isn’t a trip for the faint of heart or the very new rider, but an experience to be sure. Also, that ’08 probably could use a bit of a tune up, since in stock form a broken in Stella should do about 55mph.

      Right now, the group planned consists of one new Kymco Agility 125 and one non-running ’70 Vespa with an LML motor (much like your Stella). So, logistics of what and where the exact route and speeds are haven’t been nailed down. That and the two founding members (Wende and myself) are still sorting out day job stuff to make sure this can be done. But, a Stella can more than do the trip. The key thing is the rider. But, that’s why it’s an adventure!

      When we know more and have more time to get training and bikes up to spec, we shall keep you posted!

    • neotrotsky

      Realize that on a trip across country, the average speed is actually less than 50mph. Especially in Northern Mexico, where non-highway roads aren’t what we would call “developed” and many of them are dirt roads once you get off of the main road. It isn’t a trip for the faint of heart or the very new rider, but an experience to be sure. Also, that ’08 probably could use a bit of a tune up, since in stock form a broken in Stella should do about 55mph.

      Right now, the group planned consists of one new Kymco Agility 125 and one non-running ’70 Vespa with an LML motor (much like your Stella). So, logistics of what and where the exact route and speeds are haven’t been nailed down. That and the two founding members (Wende and myself) are still sorting out day job stuff to make sure this can be done. But, a Stella can more than do the trip. The key thing is the rider. But, that’s why it’s an adventure!

      When we know more and have more time to get training and bikes up to spec, we shall keep you posted!

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