Tag Archives: Kymco

“IIIIIII…. would scoot 500, er, kilometers…”

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So, I have had the Kymco Agility 125 for about a week officially.  It has yet to have a name, but it has been put to the magic number of 500 kilos.  So far, the break-in period is going fantastic, and I even have a bit of observation to report:

-It’s a punchy little guy!! Just *barely* slower than the Buddy 125 on initial acceleration, but from what I’ve seen, same top speed.  It may even be a hair faster, but I won’t push it to WOT until I get 1k on it

-Fit and finish, while Spartan, is tight! Not one squeak, rattle or loose bolt yet.  Although, being a single cylinder scooter I know loose bolts are coming and are a fact of life.  But so far, it’s proving itself well

-The tires? Eh. The sudden drop-off on the lip of the tire means there isn’t extra real estate to go “knee down” in the turns, and they have modest grip.  They just are cheap tires.  But, when you get a brand new scooter for under $2200 US with ALL FEES, you have to expect a cut corner or two.  This is the only place other than the copious amounts of flat unpainted plastic that shows the Kymco’s budget roots.

-Average MPG so far? 88 Miles Per Gallon.

-The suspension is tight, but perhaps a bit *too* tight.  It can be a rough ride on less developed or less maintained roads.  Of course, the tight suspension also lends itself to great cornering and it’s sporty, almost Agile if you will, feel.  It’s not for everyone, but again at this  price point you can either get comfort and sloppy handling or a bit of a rough ride and excellent handling.

All in all, this is a great urban scooter perfectly suited for the quick-punch acceleration and maneuvering critical in large urban environments.  This bike was tailor made for the commuter with decent underseat storage, sporty handling, quick acceleration, a rear rack that’s actually USEFUL and decent looks that don’t scream “Chinese Scooter Clone” just because it’s inexpensive.

Granted, this bike still costs more than the nicest Chinese clone, but not by much.  And, after seeing what this bike can do… why the hell would anyone buy a no-name bike when they can have a Kymco at this price?

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On The Road Agaaaaaiiiinnnn…..

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It’s been a while, I know.  But life has thrown some severe curves at us.  It has eaten up two bikes that I have tried to incorporate into my life and along the way thousands of dollars. During the journey homes have been shifted, friends gained and lost, jobs gained and a long trudge to two degrees has evolved.  But, the while is over.

Actually, it took a LONG while, and even then it was a fight but here it is: The new steed of mine!

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A 2013 Kymco Agility 125!!!!  Top speed of around 65mph (a smidge faster once broken in I am told), amazingly tight construction and a price that wouldn’t even bag me a clean USED Vespa.  And, it comes with a  2 year warranty! 

With Kymco’s hard push into the US market, I could no longer ignore the marque.  After finally test riding one I realized something pretty profound: They have passed some of the Japanese in build quality, and their “commuter” bikes like the Agility actually may be BETTER than Piaggio’s budget line of Flys and Typhoons!  I am dead serious in this respect too.

I would have to be.  I don’t make enough money to throw around on bikes that “maybe” better.  I had the option of buying a 2009 Piaggio Fly 150 with only 900 miles for about $800 less, and I *still* went with the Kymco. 

That is how Impressive it is in build and performance.

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Looks may be a bit debatable since you either love or hate the modern styling.  There is a lot of treated plastic on this bike (hence it’s flat black finish), so it’s going to take a lot of upkeep with the plastics protectant.  But, the wheels run a 12” rim, unlike the Genuine Scooter Co’s Buddy which rocks 10” steel rims.  The handling shows with the larger, wider running gear as well.  The suspension is VERY tight and almost rough, but in the corners this bike grips hard, making use of that tight suspension. It’s not as smooth and refined as the Vespa, but this bike is $1,899 MSRP.  Yep. That’s the everyday price.  Out the door, I paid $2149. 

You try finding a bike this well built for under $2200!  I couldn’t.

So, there it is.  I will do a proper report once I get more than 12 Kilometers on the machine.  Until then, stay tuned!


The “Replacements”: So long, Piaggio. Hello… Kymco?!

So, as the few regular readers on here know, it’s been a bit of a fight as of late to keep a scooter on the road here.  Much of it is funds, since I work in the arts and life has this pesky way of taking that meager artist’s salary and finding ways of spending it before I can.  But, a lot of the issue is finding a bike that can put up with the insane environmental conditions of where I live in Phoenix, Arizona.  Where temperatures are in the high 110’s to 115’s, and on the street surface can easily climb over 122 degrees machinery doesn’t last too long out here.  Cars literally burst into flames on the side of the highways and tires become so overheated blowouts are as common as the ubiquitous Filibertos Taco Stands that dot the city. 

There is another factor that keeps many scooters off the roads here in the US: Parts.  You see, Piaggio thinks we in the United States are no better than a rural farm town in Russia, or a tiny island in Malaysia.  This is because scooter sales here are tiny in comparison to the rest of the word, and for Piaggio and Vespa, if it’s not the number one market, they simply won’t care.  In fact during the LARGEST Vespa rally in North America, Piaggio USA did not send ONE representative.  Not one person from Piaggio came to support the largest group of Vespa riders.  Also, if you have ever tried to order parts for your Vespa, you pretty much can’t.  If you do get it, expect to wait a month to 4 months for it.  And, then there are the dealerships… or lack thereof.

Of course, then there is the price for being a member of the “elite” Vespa brand image.  What was once a shining example of transportation and style for the masses has become the iProduct of the motorcycle world, commanding prices that only the upper middle class can afford and twice to three times that of an inexpensive used sedan

It’s enough to drive you up the wall!!

So, what is a scooterist who values affordable, fashionable and fun transportation to do?  Companies like Genuine Scooter Company in cooperation with LML and PGO have done wonders in keeping the nerdy spirit of scootering alive, but they aren’t the only ones in the game.  I myself LOVE , LOVE, LOVE the Stella but their “Buddy” line of scooters are just too small to fit my tall, skinny English frame.  The Japanese makers see scooters as an afterthought in the US, where they can easily sell a liter superbike faster than a 50cc.  So we get the cast offs and the most sparse of offerings from them.

But  another company has caught my eye, and knows what they are doing when it comes to scooters.  They are the 5th largest manufacturer of motorbikes in the world, have offerings that outsell Vespa in Italy itself and have decided that the United States is where it’s at next.  It’s Kymco.

After 15 years in the US, they have gained traction as a reputable company with amazing ATV’s, Quads and scooters.  They started out working as a Honda OEM manufacturer in the 60’s, and now make some of the most popular bikes in the world and are even the manufacturers of the new BMW scooter engines and the BMW 450cc engine they use in their enduros!  They dominate in Taiwan and Austriallia, have taken HUGE positions in the market in Japan and Italy and are known for reliability and quality that rivals Honda, and that puts Piaggio in it’s place. 

And, Kymco has been building their image in the US by partnering up with NHRA race teams, sponsoring giveaways at local scooter rallies where winning a T-shirt isn’t an option, but an ENTIRE SCOOTER!  And, they have themselves thrown some crazy rallies in the US in an effort  to show that not every company ignores it’s enthusiasts.  And, it’s People 150 scooter is still considered one of the best bikes on the market nearly 10 years after its release in the US.

And, it’s down to two of their scooters for me: The Like 200i and the Agility 125.

The “Like” 200i must be one of the most bland names in scooter history.  It’s not passionate, driving or even sensible!  But, for what it lacks in creativity, it brings in features!  Now, the Like 200i isn’t actually a 200cc… it’s 163cc.  Yeah, a little misleading.  But what it doesn’t tell you is that it makes up for this with a Fuel-Injected engine with front and rear disc brakes all on a largeframe scooter chassis backed by the typical bullet proof Kymco engine and a 2 year/unlimited mileage warranty!  While some are quick to point out that it’s “retro” styling is too close to Vespa, I tend to disagree.  Vespa didn’t invent the scooter even if it wants the world to think so  (much like Apple not stopping people from thinking it invented the touchscreen smartphone).  To me, it says more “Lambretta” with those flat vented sides and strong front rake. 

So it’s fuel injected, well equipped with braking and even comes with the topcase as standard.  What’s to make *me* buy this over a Vespa LX150?  Well, the LX150 starts at $4,200US plus fees.  The MSRP on this? $2,599US.  And, Vespa will only give you a 1 year warranty.

This is the front runner because a local dealership has TWO on sale for the low, low price of $2,095US!  You get all the features of a Vespa (save the all steel body) with a lot more piece of mind.  And, you can actually find more than one Kymco dealer in your state as opposed to the Italians (if your state even has a Piaggio dealer).  In fact, many states have more Kymco dealers than Yamaha dealers, and I have respect for the tuning-fork logo!

The other scooter on my radar is at the bottom of the price range, but not the last in the line when it comes to quality: The Agility 125

This is a bare-bones scoot, but well put together: 125cc air cooled, carbureted mill.  Front disc, rear drum.  It’ has all the modern scoot basics and an engine that will get you to 60-ish miles per hour… and that’s it.  No auto-stability system, no GPS systems, no nothing.  Just scooter.  It’s the modern smallframe and that’s a good thing.  It’s the same base engine as the Kymco 125cc lot of other scoots, but in a clean, poly shell and tube steel chassis.

So, why the hell is this thing so interesting?  Try an MSRP of $1,799US.  No, that’s not a clearance price.  Yes, that includes the 2 year warranty.  Their 50cc Version eeks in at under $1,399US!  You can hardly get a China-Clone scooter for that!!! And, it’s one of the top 10 selling scooters in Italy, known for being one of the largest and most competitive scooter markets in the world!  They sell more scooters there than in the entirety of North America!  So, that’s a lot of Agility for the buck.

To be fair, these scooters aren’t manufactured in Taiwan, where Kymco is headquartered.  They are made in a Kymco-only owned factory in China.  Now, some may balk at this idea especially after how much I rag on Chinese scooters.  BUT, this is a Kymco run facility and they have a rep around the world for running a *tight* ship.  Also, consider that the Vespa S150, Piaggio Fly and Piaggio Typhoon are ALSO made in China under a plant owned by Piaggio.  Yep: You think you may be buying Italian and thus buying “better”, but as it turns out Piaggio is taking a page from Kymco in an effort to stay competitive. 

So, it’s down to these two for me.  There will be another Stella in my drive, make no doubt about that!  But, for the winter and for commuting, it’s down to these two juggernauts of the scooter world that 10-15 years ago would have been unthinkable: Taiwanese scooters out-performing and out lasting Japanese and Italian competitors?  Then again, who would of thought ten years ago that our cell phone choice would depend on what operating system and what video phone options we could get.

The times, they are a’changing….


Guess what made Motorcycle.com’s Best of 2011 list…

Yep, it goes to show what is old is new again, especially if it comes with a new twist!  According to motorcycle.com, the best scooter on the market in the US for 2011 is the Stella 150 4T!

It’s really no surprise, since LML (the manufacturers of the Stella for Genuine Scooter Company) totally re-designed the engine to accommodate 4 cycle fuel management and did away with having to mix oil and gas, but kept the steel chassis and manual shifting goodness. New conveniences like disc brakes and old favourites like the ability to use nearly every Vintage Vespa PX/Stella 2T accessory make it a winning combo.  Add to this the continuing good sales of their “Buddy” line of scooters and rumblings of an automatic “crusier” scooter soon to join the line up, and Genuine is shaping up to have a strong return to the top of the scooter heap

The Kymco People 300i took honorable mention, which isn’t a bad place to be for a great large scooter.  It’s upgrade to fuel injection along with an equally needed injection of updated styling make this bike a good freeway commuter for the money at $5399.  While about the same price as a Vespa GTS300, it gives a much needed alternative for scooter riders who don’t want a scooter version of a Goldwing

So, it’s something for everyone tonight!


Why not a Chinese Scooter? They’re “Cheaper”! Well, this is why…

I’m a bit of a scooter snob.  I only ride “major market” bikes.  Why? Well, because I enjoy breathing and really don’t want to die on a Chinese POS  made in the same fashion you make toasters or Hello Kitty rice cookers!  I also dislike companies that make deathtraps and purposely lie to gain sales, and who copy designs simply to mislead you from your money.

“But, they’re cheaper!  You must have something against the Chinese.  Or, perhaps you’re just a snob!” is the usual response I get.  I also hear many claim Chinese scooters are superior to Vespa for the low, low price of $999, but by people who still have the 30 day plate on their bike.  I have yet to hear this argument from anyone with a  Chinese scooter older than 1 year.  Also, the most vocal of those insisting people NOT buy bikes from companies like Honda or Vespa are the ones selling them, and insist it’s a “plot” by the oil companies to keep scooters expensive to keep the poor from having efficient transport.  But, there’s always a line…

I always insist that if you have either never heard of the bike, or you cannot find MULTIPLE brick-and-mortar dealers within one state that have a legit company and product line behind them, don’t buy.  But, how do you know what’s Chinese-made and what’s not? And, what makes Chinese bikes so bad? If you’re new to the scooter scene, you may not of heard of a lot of the vintage bikes like Heinkel, Lambretta or Italjet that everyone keeps raving about… so what makes Chinese scooters like Roketa, Lance and TN’G any different?

Long story short: China is currently the masters of mass manufacture.  They have the ability to copy, retool and produce at an alarming rate.  When it’s something like a Microwave or computer components, that’s a good thing since they are easy to quality check and don’t normally have lives on the line.  But, the more complex the machine, the more quality control is needed.  The problem is that many scooters made in mainland China are slapped together and use copies of copies of old engine designs from Honda or Yamaha.  And, they use the cheapest materials in order to bring the price point down.  You get bikes made like bargain basement dishwashers and Wal-Mart TV’s that you’re supposed to trust your life to at 55mph?  They have ZERO delaership networks too!  You won’t find parts for a Chinese scooter, because once they crank out a few hundred thousand of one model, they scrap the ENTIRE line and re-tool from fresh for the new model.  That means they don’t have compatible parts on hand, since dead-stock=no profit. 

Another trick they use is to claim the engine is “Honda Made” or “Same as Honda”. This has some origin: 99% of all Chinese scooters are powered by a copied variant of an engine developed by Honda called a GY6.  Now, this was a very innovative engine and pretty high tech… for 1989.  It’s a good engine when you have an engine blueprinted, built and inspected by the high-tech plants at Honda of Japan and when high-end metals, rubbers and electronics are used.  Chinese copies are just that: Copied plans that have been copied several DOZEN times.  Ever put a picture through a Xerox machine a dozen times?  Then you know what I mean when I say that once you copy something too many times, the end result is pretty messed up and garbled.  Things get changed along the way, and the quality of materials gets worse each time in order to cut down on costs.  Soon that “Honda Engine” has a sort-of similar shape, but not one part will fit it from the original engine design, and nothing will look the same on the interior.

They will even ripp off the names and appearance of well known bikes!  One Chinese scooter company even bought out the Shwinn bicycle company just to get it’s copyright to sell electric kick-scooters AND China-made motorscooters under the same brand!  Needless to say, they both failed.  This aping also applies to the exterior look, with designs from Kymco, Honda, Vespa and even Harley Davidson applied to make the bikes look as much as their Asian and European cousins in order to con people into thinking their bike is in any way related to the big guys.

Also, most Chinese bikes don’t even pass basic DOT road worthiness inspections or air-quality standards.  How do they get around it?  Well, they sell them as “off road only” bikes, and don’t give a buyer a title.  You get what’s called an MCO (Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin) and the dealer leaves it up to YOU the buyer to fight the DMV to get a real title.  And in the US, without a title you don’t really own an automobile or motorbike, and can’t get it registered for street use.  If the ‘dealer’ makes you get the title yourself and doesn’t provide you with actual plates, then you are at a China-bike dealer!

Other “major market” bike builders like Vespa, Honda, Kymco, Genuine/PGO, LML and the like think different.  They put the money into inspecting the bike and using QUALITY components first, and know that the true money is repeat service with reliable supplies of parts to keep bikes on the road for a long time.  This keeps the rider coming back for upgrades and parts, and that makes good money.  It’s good business.  And, unlike no-name Chinese scooters bought from Habib at the corner tire shop or from Pep Boys, you can go to a DEALER who has direct contact to the manufacturer if there is a problem.  Good luck trying to get that park-n-swap guy to service your Chinese copy of a Kymco/Ruckus/Vespa. 

But, I can only extol the dangers so much.  The man who can accurately describe WHY is a legend in the Scooter scene: Phil from Pride of Cleveland Scooters.  His shop deals in the best of bikes, and are renowned nationwide for not only their service, but aftermarket support for all things scooter. Be it Vespa, Buddy, Stella, Lambretta or Honda, they see it all and Phil can fill you in.  He’s responsible for making a series of “public service announcement” vids that show what a Chinese scooter looks like, what it is, and why they are dangerous!  Once you see his run down on what to look for, you’ll start to spot Chinese scooters all over the place and will begin to understand why they are so cheap, and so reviled by the scooter community. 

Check these few out:

A great example of the “low grade” materials issue”
You hear a lot of Chinese scooters claim “Anti-Lock Brakes”, but in truth they are FAKE and actually are dangerous! Phil explains why in this classic example of a Chinese scooter style very popular in the US…for about 100 miles
This is the BEST example of what a true “China bike” is, and what to look for. Phil knows his stuff, and probably sees HUNDREDS of these. Heed his words!

Are all cheap scooters bad? Well… yes!!!  But, there are inexpensive major market bikes that will blow these China-rific scoots out of the water.  In fact, one of the biggest bike manufacturers in the world, Kymco, is constantly ripped-off by China and two of the three bikes in the videos above are clones of their own Cobra-Cross!  Their bikes start at a low $1299 and go all the way to $8,000.  But, unlike the bikes made in China, Kymco has a long reputation, hard dealerships and excellent quality.  They are also based out of Taiwan, which is NOT subjet to mainland China’s lax laws and ignorant copyright approaches.  Did I mention Kymco is also a manufacturer of a bunch of engines and components for other bike companies such as Yamaha?

PGO is another company that sells great bikes that you may not know off the bat. But, if you have seen the Genuine Buddy or Blur, you’ve seen their bikes! In fact PGO under partnership with Genuine Scooters currently makes the most popular scooter in America!  And, they’re so good that even Vespa dealerships sell them next to their Italian wares.  And, unlike Chinese scooters that may come with a 30 day “warranty” Genuine’s Buddy and Blur come with a 2 YEAR warranty!  And, since they’re sold all over the world, the aftermarket is huge for them.  And, like Kymco, they’ve even built scooters for other bike companies you may of heard of, such as Vespa!

So, while a cheap scooter is tempting, ask yourself: Would you hurl yourself down the road on a bike with the same build quality as a Wal-Mart blender (and on a bike that probably uses the exact same bearings as previously mentioned blender)? Or, would you rather have a bike you KNOW is going to work and is sold worldwide legally?  While many of us can’t afford a $4700 base model Vespa, you  don’t have to resort to a $999 Pep Boys China clone.  Research is your best friend, and don’t be afraid to join popular scooter club message boards and to even stop the average rider on the street.  If they genuinely love their bike, they’ll gladly chat about it.  I myself have owned a $500 Chinese scooter all the way to a top of the line Vespa GTS25oie with every engine upgrade imaginable, dropping nearly $10,000 on it over all.  And, I learned the same way: Asking others, researching like mad and getting my hands on as many bikes as possible.

And, in the end, even my happy butt is picking up a Genuine Scooter Company bike next month!  Be it the Stella 150 or the Buddy 125 (not sure yet… both are VERY tempting), I’ve learned that in some cases, you get what you pay for but it doesn’t hurt to try to get a good deal when it’s a SMART deal!